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Panasonic th 65vx100

Panasonic th 65vx100

panasonic th 65vx100

An excellent performer in its own right, the Premiere series nonetheless fell a bit short of Pioneer's Kuro plasma, still the best display we've. The new TH VX is no exception: Operation is problem-free and straightforward, and the menu gives easy access to picture modes, inputs. Unlike most of the display products we cover here at AVForums, Panasonic's THVX is a monitor, not a television. WORKOUT PLANNER Operator, you may CAST. Click on Advance. Cons: Complicated setup no port with should explain how your order delivered or create your. Every image has an alternative text attributes set on. And when the client is configured tigervnc-server-moduletigervnc are configured with.

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On the other hand, picture adjustments abound, beginning with three adjustable picture modes and a fourth, titled Monitor, that offers limited adjustments and is designed to show a studio monitor-style picture. We appreciated the capability to save picture adjustments into a massive slot memory bank. The Advanced menu includes a range of additional options, including full white balance controls, four gamma controls, and a few more esoteric options such as automatic gain control and input level.

Our favorite setting was the External Scalar mode, which basically turns off all of the video processing and scaling built into the TV, and displays the p input signal as purely as possible. Unfortunately, when the TV is in this mode and you send it a signal that's not p, the screen remains a blank until you disengage the mode easy enough since the remote has a dedicated "EXT. We'd like to see this mode better implemented, with a warning message instead of a blank screen, but it's still nice to have.

As befits a monitor, the TH-VXU has the capability to adjust the position and size of the onscreen image six ways from Sunday. The " pixel mode" is also a boon for use with i and p sources since it maps them to the display with no scaling or overscan , preserving the full resolution. You can choose from five aspect ratio choices with high-definition sources and four with standard-definition sources. Panasonic also includes numerous options to prevent and remedy burn-in , or image retention.

If image retention occurs, you can engage a scrolling bar, a full-white screen or a reverse color image and set a timer to end it automatically. There are even four different levels of brightness you can apply to the bars to either side of images. Like most plasmas displays, the TH-VXU uses a lot of power check out the Juice box --which only applies to the inch version we tested, not the inch model.

Unlike Panasonic's consumer models, no concession was made to Energy Star 3. They do offer a power saver mode that again suppresses peak light output to cut down on consumption somewhat, and there's a standby power save mode too, although we couldn't measure any difference between leaving that mode turned on or off. In a first among high-definition displays we've tested, the TH-VXU is utterly without standard-definition inputs.

There are no RF, S-Video, or composite-video inputs to be found, and unless you purchase an optional input board, you can't connect any gear that doesn't have a high-definition output. All of the inputs are arrayed in a downward-facing row around back, and joined by an RS port for custom installations. Still, compared with most consumer displays, the Premiere sports a pretty anemic input selection.

As with other Panasonic professional plasmas, most of the inputs are housed on removable boards that slide up into the back of the panel. You can replace any of the included boards--a long list of optional boards can be found on Panasonic's Web site.

Performance An excellent performer in its own right, the Premiere series nonetheless fell a bit short of Pioneer's Kuro plasma, still the best display we've tested in overall picture quality. Its black levels were excellent, as was shadow detail, but in these areas it couldn't beat the best. We were also a bit disappointed in its color accuracy, but nonetheless the TH-VXU still delivers one of the best-quality pictures we've tested. During the calibration process, we tweaked the myriad settings to come as close as possible to our baseline light output and color and we were pleased by the results.

We were initially attracted to the Monitor mode, but its lack of adjustments and dim picture sent us back to using Cinema for our main calibration. We didn't expect to hit our nominal light output target of 40 footlamberts on the inch plasma and, sure enough, we did not in Cinema mode. Instead, we maxed out at a still-respectable 36 afterward although, for the record, the inch set can hit a plenty-bright 60ftl in its brightest setting.

In terms of color temperature, we were able to improve on the default Warm setting quite a bit, and we achieved a very linear grayscale afterward--although not as linear as we saw on the Pioneer PROFD. For our complete picture settings, check out the bottom of this blog post.

Black level: In terms of delivering the deepest black possible, the Kuro was still better than the Panasonic, and in our comparison the difference was easily visible. But with the exception of the Kuro, the TH-VXU produced the deepest black in the room, easily beating the Samsung display, for example, and surpassing the Sony, albeit not as handily.

We didn't have any of the Panasonic consumer models on hand to pit against the VXU, but we'd bet the Premiere gets as dark, if not darker than those, and its overall depth of black is superb. In its marketing material for the Premiere series, Panasonic touts the series' shadow detail as surpassing that of the Pioneer and other high-end models. In our tests, however, we had a difficult time separating the Kuro from the Premiere in this regard.

After proper adjustment, both delivered superb detail in shadowy areas, such as the torture scene at the beginning of Chapter 2 where differences in the detail in DiCaprio's half-shaded face, the hair of the detainee, and the towel around his mouth were vanishingly slight to our eyes. Any differences we could discern could be more attributable to the Pioneer's superior depth of black than to any superiority on the Panasonic's part to resolve detail in shadows.

Note that the above observations were made on a inch THVXU, which has a contrast ratio of 65, as opposed to the 40, contrast ratio specification of the inch THVXU. As a result, the inch version may produce slightly lighter blacks--then again, it may not. If there is a visible difference between the black-level performance of the two panels, we expect it to be slight. Color accuracy: Here's where the Panasonic definitely takes a back seat to the Kuro. Both displays conform relatively closely to the D65 grayscale standard, but the Kuro is a bit closer.

The biggest divergence, however, comes in the two displays' primary and secondary color representation. Panasonic chose a relatively wide color gamut, as opposed to the narrower Rec. Greens on the Panasonic, such as the bottle of DiCaprio's beer, the stems of the cut flowers in the market, and the desert plants in Chapter 3, appeared too intense and neon-looking compared with the rest of the displays, which all deliver more-accurate primary colors. The difference also showed in skin tones, like the lighter DiCaprio and the darker turncoat insurgent, which took on a slightly greenish cast in comparison.

The blue sky above the Iraqi desert also appeared slightly more greenish on the Panasonic. We turned down the TH-VXU's color control somewhat to compensate, although as a result colors appeared a bit less-saturated then we'd like. However, saturation was still very good, and colors popped as we'd expect from a high-end plasma with deep black levels.

We performed a hands-on evaluation of the inch model, but we expect our observations to apply nearly equally to the inch model, since they have very similar specifications. One exception is that the inch model had a lower contrast ratio, although we don't expect that to make a major impact on picture quality. Any potential differences between the two are noted in the full review below.

Design The TH-VXU lacks the stark, industrial gray frame of the company's less-expensive TH-PF11UK professional panels, instead going with a burnished metal black finish along the top and bottom and matte black metal along the sides. Abutting the glass of the screen itself is a black border about 0. The entire frame is thicker than that of the 11UK series, but more attractive to our eyes. As with the company's industrial models, Panasonic does not include a stand with the Premiere series.

However, the company does sell sloped, matching black stands specifically for the series. We appreciated that Panasonic included its standard consumer remote control, with its big, well-differentiated buttons and simple layout, but there are a few key pun intended differences. The company added another row of four buttons to allow direct access to each of the four HDMI inputs; the PC and component-video inputs get dedicated keys too. The volume and channel rockers are gone, replaced by input and video mode toggles.

Some of the new key assignments go astray though. For example, we kept inadvertently selecting the component-video input since its key lurked near the cursor control where "exit" or "back" usually belong. The remote can command three other pieces of equipment.

The many-paged menu is chocked with options, yet getting around is surprisingly easy. Numerous technical terms await the uninitiated, from "Normalize" known to mortals as "reset" to "AGC. Features If you're expecting speakers and a tuner, you're out of luck. Owners of Premiere plasmas are expected to supply their own external audio systems or pony up for the custom speakers and cable or satellite boxes, which isn't too much to ask given the plasma's well-heeled target market.

On the other hand, picture adjustments abound, beginning with three adjustable picture modes and a fourth, titled Monitor, that offers limited adjustments and is designed to show a studio monitor-style picture. We appreciated the capability to save picture adjustments into a massive slot memory bank. The Advanced menu includes a range of additional options, including full white balance controls, four gamma controls, and a few more esoteric options such as automatic gain control and input level.

Our favorite setting was the External Scalar mode, which basically turns off all of the video processing and scaling built into the TV, and displays the p input signal as purely as possible. Unfortunately, when the TV is in this mode and you send it a signal that's not p, the screen remains a blank until you disengage the mode easy enough since the remote has a dedicated "EXT. We'd like to see this mode better implemented, with a warning message instead of a blank screen, but it's still nice to have.

As befits a monitor, the TH-VXU has the capability to adjust the position and size of the onscreen image six ways from Sunday. The " pixel mode" is also a boon for use with i and p sources since it maps them to the display with no scaling or overscan , preserving the full resolution.

You can choose from five aspect ratio choices with high-definition sources and four with standard-definition sources. Panasonic also includes numerous options to prevent and remedy burn-in , or image retention.

If image retention occurs, you can engage a scrolling bar, a full-white screen or a reverse color image and set a timer to end it automatically. There are even four different levels of brightness you can apply to the bars to either side of images. Like most plasmas displays, the TH-VXU uses a lot of power check out the Juice box --which only applies to the inch version we tested, not the inch model.

Unlike Panasonic's consumer models, no concession was made to Energy Star 3. They do offer a power saver mode that again suppresses peak light output to cut down on consumption somewhat, and there's a standby power save mode too, although we couldn't measure any difference between leaving that mode turned on or off. In a first among high-definition displays we've tested, the TH-VXU is utterly without standard-definition inputs. There are no RF, S-Video, or composite-video inputs to be found, and unless you purchase an optional input board, you can't connect any gear that doesn't have a high-definition output.

All of the inputs are arrayed in a downward-facing row around back, and joined by an RS port for custom installations. Still, compared with most consumer displays, the Premiere sports a pretty anemic input selection. As with other Panasonic professional plasmas, most of the inputs are housed on removable boards that slide up into the back of the panel.

You can replace any of the included boards--a long list of optional boards can be found on Panasonic's Web site. Performance An excellent performer in its own right, the Premiere series nonetheless fell a bit short of Pioneer's Kuro plasma, still the best display we've tested in overall picture quality. Its black levels were excellent, as was shadow detail, but in these areas it couldn't beat the best.

We were also a bit disappointed in its color accuracy, but nonetheless the TH-VXU still delivers one of the best-quality pictures we've tested. During the calibration process, we tweaked the myriad settings to come as close as possible to our baseline light output and color and we were pleased by the results.

We were initially attracted to the Monitor mode, but its lack of adjustments and dim picture sent us back to using Cinema for our main calibration. We didn't expect to hit our nominal light output target of 40 footlamberts on the inch plasma and, sure enough, we did not in Cinema mode.

Instead, we maxed out at a still-respectable 36 afterward although, for the record, the inch set can hit a plenty-bright 60ftl in its brightest setting. In terms of color temperature, we were able to improve on the default Warm setting quite a bit, and we achieved a very linear grayscale afterward--although not as linear as we saw on the Pioneer PROFD. For our complete picture settings, check out the bottom of this blog post.

Black level: In terms of delivering the deepest black possible, the Kuro was still better than the Panasonic, and in our comparison the difference was easily visible.

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【Panasonicテレビ2021】全モデル比較解説【おすすめモデル、VIERA】 panasonic th 65vx100

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All of the inputs are arrayed in a downward-facing row around back, and joined by an RS port for custom installations. Still, compared with most consumer displays, the Premiere sports a pretty anemic input selection. As with other Panasonic professional plasmas, most of the inputs are housed on removable boards that slide up into the back of the panel. You can replace any of the included boards--a long list of optional boards can be found on Panasonic's Web site. Performance An excellent performer in its own right, the Premiere series nonetheless fell a bit short of Pioneer's Kuro plasma, still the best display we've tested in overall picture quality.

Its black levels were excellent, as was shadow detail, but in these areas it couldn't beat the best. We were also a bit disappointed in its color accuracy, but nonetheless the TH-VXU still delivers one of the best-quality pictures we've tested. During the calibration process, we tweaked the myriad settings to come as close as possible to our baseline light output and color and we were pleased by the results.

We were initially attracted to the Monitor mode, but its lack of adjustments and dim picture sent us back to using Cinema for our main calibration. We didn't expect to hit our nominal light output target of 40 footlamberts on the inch plasma and, sure enough, we did not in Cinema mode. Instead, we maxed out at a still-respectable 36 afterward although, for the record, the inch set can hit a plenty-bright 60ftl in its brightest setting.

In terms of color temperature, we were able to improve on the default Warm setting quite a bit, and we achieved a very linear grayscale afterward--although not as linear as we saw on the Pioneer PROFD. For our complete picture settings, check out the bottom of this blog post. Black level: In terms of delivering the deepest black possible, the Kuro was still better than the Panasonic, and in our comparison the difference was easily visible.

But with the exception of the Kuro, the TH-VXU produced the deepest black in the room, easily beating the Samsung display, for example, and surpassing the Sony, albeit not as handily. We didn't have any of the Panasonic consumer models on hand to pit against the VXU, but we'd bet the Premiere gets as dark, if not darker than those, and its overall depth of black is superb.

In its marketing material for the Premiere series, Panasonic touts the series' shadow detail as surpassing that of the Pioneer and other high-end models. In our tests, however, we had a difficult time separating the Kuro from the Premiere in this regard.

After proper adjustment, both delivered superb detail in shadowy areas, such as the torture scene at the beginning of Chapter 2 where differences in the detail in DiCaprio's half-shaded face, the hair of the detainee, and the towel around his mouth were vanishingly slight to our eyes. Any differences we could discern could be more attributable to the Pioneer's superior depth of black than to any superiority on the Panasonic's part to resolve detail in shadows.

Note that the above observations were made on a inch THVXU, which has a contrast ratio of 65, as opposed to the 40, contrast ratio specification of the inch THVXU. As a result, the inch version may produce slightly lighter blacks--then again, it may not. If there is a visible difference between the black-level performance of the two panels, we expect it to be slight. Color accuracy: Here's where the Panasonic definitely takes a back seat to the Kuro. Both displays conform relatively closely to the D65 grayscale standard, but the Kuro is a bit closer.

The biggest divergence, however, comes in the two displays' primary and secondary color representation. Panasonic chose a relatively wide color gamut, as opposed to the narrower Rec. Greens on the Panasonic, such as the bottle of DiCaprio's beer, the stems of the cut flowers in the market, and the desert plants in Chapter 3, appeared too intense and neon-looking compared with the rest of the displays, which all deliver more-accurate primary colors.

The difference also showed in skin tones, like the lighter DiCaprio and the darker turncoat insurgent, which took on a slightly greenish cast in comparison. The blue sky above the Iraqi desert also appeared slightly more greenish on the Panasonic. We turned down the TH-VXU's color control somewhat to compensate, although as a result colors appeared a bit less-saturated then we'd like. However, saturation was still very good, and colors popped as we'd expect from a high-end plasma with deep black levels.

Video processing: The Premiere delivered every line of a i and p resolution pattern as well as between and lines of motion resolution--par for the p plasma course. Also, unlike all other Panasonic plasmas we've reviewed, it successfully deinterlaced i content.

We asked a Panasonic engineer about the display's Hz refresh rate, and he said that it actually refreshes at 96Hz, not Hz. Pans like the slow movement at the beginning of Chapter 2 over DiCaprio's prone form showed the difference best. Bright lighting: In a bright room with the windows open opposite the TH-VXU's screen, the display didn't do a very good job of attenuating glare.

The antireflective screen of the Pioneer and the Samsung were both more-effective and, of course, the relatively matte-screen Sony LCD performed best of all in this scenario. Standard-definition: The TH-VXU doesn't have any standard-definition inputs, so we didn't perform standard-definition testing. With analog sources via VGA, it accepted 1,x1,pixel resolution source, but didn't display it correctly.

The best resolution we could get to display properly was 1,x pixels, which as expected on a p monitor appeared relatively soft and not expected didn't completely fill the screen without a lot of adjustment. We recommend going in via HDMI with computer sources. David Katzmaier.

Extremely expensive; inaccurate primary colors; light connectivity with just one component-video and no standard-definition inputs; no speakers or stand included. Panasonic's high-end Premiere plasmas put out professional-quality images for a correspondingly high price.

Panasonic's main picture menu screen has small type, rudimentary graphics and plenty of adjustments. The Advanced Settings menu offers numerous picture controls, including white balance and gamma. Among a few other settings in the Signal mode, there's an "external scalar" setting, which turns off all of the TV's processing options. In addition to providing adjustments for screen size and position, yet another menu includes the important " pixel mode.

Our favorite setting was the External Scalar mode, which basically turns off all of the video processing and scaling built into the TV, and displays the p input signal as purely as possible. Unfortunately, when the TV is in this mode and you send it a signal that's not p, the screen remains a blank until you disengage the mode easy enough since the remote has a dedicated "EXT. We'd like to see this mode better implemented, with a warning message instead of a blank screen, but it's still nice to have.

As befits a monitor, the TH-VXU has the capability to adjust the position and size of the onscreen image six ways from Sunday. The " pixel mode" is also a boon for use with i and p sources since it maps them to the display with no scaling or overscan , preserving the full resolution. You can choose from five aspect ratio choices with high-definition sources and four with standard-definition sources.

Panasonic also includes numerous options to prevent and remedy burn-in , or image retention. If image retention occurs, you can engage a scrolling bar, a full-white screen or a reverse color image and set a timer to end it automatically. There are even four different levels of brightness you can apply to the bars to either side of images. Like most plasmas displays, the TH-VXU uses a lot of power check out the Juice box --which only applies to the inch version we tested, not the inch model.

Unlike Panasonic's consumer models, no concession was made to Energy Star 3. They do offer a power saver mode that again suppresses peak light output to cut down on consumption somewhat, and there's a standby power save mode too, although we couldn't measure any difference between leaving that mode turned on or off. In a first among high-definition displays we've tested, the TH-VXU is utterly without standard-definition inputs.

There are no RF, S-Video, or composite-video inputs to be found, and unless you purchase an optional input board, you can't connect any gear that doesn't have a high-definition output. All of the inputs are arrayed in a downward-facing row around back, and joined by an RS port for custom installations.

Still, compared with most consumer displays, the Premiere sports a pretty anemic input selection. As with other Panasonic professional plasmas, most of the inputs are housed on removable boards that slide up into the back of the panel. You can replace any of the included boards--a long list of optional boards can be found on Panasonic's Web site. Performance An excellent performer in its own right, the Premiere series nonetheless fell a bit short of Pioneer's Kuro plasma, still the best display we've tested in overall picture quality.

Its black levels were excellent, as was shadow detail, but in these areas it couldn't beat the best. We were also a bit disappointed in its color accuracy, but nonetheless the TH-VXU still delivers one of the best-quality pictures we've tested. During the calibration process, we tweaked the myriad settings to come as close as possible to our baseline light output and color and we were pleased by the results.

We were initially attracted to the Monitor mode, but its lack of adjustments and dim picture sent us back to using Cinema for our main calibration. We didn't expect to hit our nominal light output target of 40 footlamberts on the inch plasma and, sure enough, we did not in Cinema mode.

Instead, we maxed out at a still-respectable 36 afterward although, for the record, the inch set can hit a plenty-bright 60ftl in its brightest setting. In terms of color temperature, we were able to improve on the default Warm setting quite a bit, and we achieved a very linear grayscale afterward--although not as linear as we saw on the Pioneer PROFD. For our complete picture settings, check out the bottom of this blog post. Black level: In terms of delivering the deepest black possible, the Kuro was still better than the Panasonic, and in our comparison the difference was easily visible.

But with the exception of the Kuro, the TH-VXU produced the deepest black in the room, easily beating the Samsung display, for example, and surpassing the Sony, albeit not as handily. We didn't have any of the Panasonic consumer models on hand to pit against the VXU, but we'd bet the Premiere gets as dark, if not darker than those, and its overall depth of black is superb.

In its marketing material for the Premiere series, Panasonic touts the series' shadow detail as surpassing that of the Pioneer and other high-end models. In our tests, however, we had a difficult time separating the Kuro from the Premiere in this regard. After proper adjustment, both delivered superb detail in shadowy areas, such as the torture scene at the beginning of Chapter 2 where differences in the detail in DiCaprio's half-shaded face, the hair of the detainee, and the towel around his mouth were vanishingly slight to our eyes.

Any differences we could discern could be more attributable to the Pioneer's superior depth of black than to any superiority on the Panasonic's part to resolve detail in shadows. Note that the above observations were made on a inch THVXU, which has a contrast ratio of 65, as opposed to the 40, contrast ratio specification of the inch THVXU. As a result, the inch version may produce slightly lighter blacks--then again, it may not.

If there is a visible difference between the black-level performance of the two panels, we expect it to be slight. Color accuracy: Here's where the Panasonic definitely takes a back seat to the Kuro. Both displays conform relatively closely to the D65 grayscale standard, but the Kuro is a bit closer. The biggest divergence, however, comes in the two displays' primary and secondary color representation. Panasonic chose a relatively wide color gamut, as opposed to the narrower Rec.

Greens on the Panasonic, such as the bottle of DiCaprio's beer, the stems of the cut flowers in the market, and the desert plants in Chapter 3, appeared too intense and neon-looking compared with the rest of the displays, which all deliver more-accurate primary colors. The difference also showed in skin tones, like the lighter DiCaprio and the darker turncoat insurgent, which took on a slightly greenish cast in comparison.

The blue sky above the Iraqi desert also appeared slightly more greenish on the Panasonic. We turned down the TH-VXU's color control somewhat to compensate, although as a result colors appeared a bit less-saturated then we'd like. However, saturation was still very good, and colors popped as we'd expect from a high-end plasma with deep black levels.

Video processing: The Premiere delivered every line of a i and p resolution pattern as well as between and lines of motion resolution--par for the p plasma course. Also, unlike all other Panasonic plasmas we've reviewed, it successfully deinterlaced i content. We asked a Panasonic engineer about the display's Hz refresh rate, and he said that it actually refreshes at 96Hz, not Hz.

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Panasonic TH-58PZ700U

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